La prévention du VIH et la lutte contre les ITSS

En élaborant ses projets de prévention et de lutte contre le VIH et les autres ITSS, le CCNMI tient compte du besoin croissant du milieu de voir les interventions en matière de VIH et d’ITSS se déployer de manière plus stratégique, intégrée et coordonnée au Canada.

Coordonner les efforts de prévention du VIH et des ITSS

Le CCNMI vise à combler les lacunes recensées par notre réseau d’experts en matière de savoir. Il facilite les partenariats et crée des occasions d’échange, de partage et de transfert de connaissances entre les différents secteurs de la santé publique au moyen d’une variété de plateformes, allant des formes classiques de rencontres entre experts, de webinaires et de publications de revues de la littérature scientifique et d’études de cas, aux formes plus novatrices des baladodiffusions, des communautés virtuelles et des capsules vidéo en temps réel. Les ressources produites jusqu’à maintenant portent sur l’intervention préventive auprès des personnes atteintes d’une ITSS et de leurs partenaires, les réponses de la santé publique visant à contenir les éclosions de syphilis en milieux urbains et ruraux, et les procédés mis en place pour mesurer les estimés nationaux des cibles 90-90-90 pour le VIH, et encore plus.

NOUVEAU

RESSOURCES

SCREENING AND DIAGNOSIS

Reach underserved areas and disadvantaged populations in Canada

TOWARDS OPTIMIZING THE USE OF NEW RAPID SCREENING TECHNOLOGIES FOR SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED AND BLOOD-BORNE INFECTIONS (STBBIS) TO PROVIDE BETTER SERVICES FOR THOSE WHO NEED THEM MOST

New rapid point-of-care testing technologies offer the opportunity to rethink STBBI screening services in Canada and reach individuals who do not ordinarily have access to health services or who are lost to follow-up due to their isolation geographical or social By offering the possibility of being used by different types of users and outside the usual laboratory diagnostic services, these technologies can support innovation in screening programs and the provision of services that are culturally and contextually better adapted to the needs of underserved and marginalized populations.

To date, the use of these new technologies has not kept its promises in Canada, as they are still underutilized, and few kits and devices are licensed in Canada. In addition, the majority of studies that have used them have remained as pilot projects, with little capacity to increase operations to sustainable funding programs.

In order for these research successes to be translated into a fair testing program and able to meet the needs of underserved populations in Canada, different sectors and levels of government must come together and coordinate to recognize the needs that exist in Canada. , to share the evidence supporting the development of innovative programs that address these needs, and to identify the factors that contribute to the success and sustainability of these programs.

To support the introduction of new screening programs in Canada, NCCID has developed a series of resources to enable the exchange and mobilization of knowledge on this topic. The resources offered by NCCID are:

  • A series of four webinars, produced in partnership with CATIE and REACH 2.0, Joining the Undiagnosed , which explores new options for diversifying screening strategies for HIV and other STBBIs in Canada.
  • A review of the literature that summarizes existing technologies for rapid point-of-care screening of STBBIs and their performance , and identifies devices and kits that are currently licensed and in use in Canada.
  • WILL BE SOON AVAILABLE: A review of the literature that summarizes the different approaches being put in place to integrate these new technologies into STBBI testing programs in Canada and internationally. The evidence presented in this paper illustrates the acceptability and feasibility of using these technologies in new screening programs and the ability of these programs to improve STBBI screening among under-served and disadvantaged populations.
  • An expert commentary by Dr. Nitika Pant Pai and Dr. Marc Steben that describes the factors that delay the use of these new technologies in Canada, and the means to address them.

Public health ethics

A CASE FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES
  • FRENCH : Tuesday, January 31, 2017. Guest Expert: Dr. Marc Steben
  • IN ENGLISH : Tuesday, January 24, 2017. Invited Experts: Dr. Nitika Pant Pai and Dr. Mohammad Khan

During this webinar presented in collaboration with the NCCHPP, participants will discuss evidence and ethical issues related to expanding the use of screening technologies in service outlets in remote and northern communities.

Explore alternative HIV testing methods to meet Canada’s commitment to UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets

MEETING REPORT

April 26, 2018, SHARE, National HIV / AIDS Research Laboratories, National Microbiology Laboratory of the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), Saskatchewan SHARE Project (HIV / AIDS Research) ) and NCCID brought together partners and participants to reflect on alternative methods of HIV testing. During the session , new technologies and testing approaches were presented that could potentially expand HIV testing options in Canada if they were expanded to reach people where they are.


APPROACHES TO PUBLIC HEALTH

Exploring the determinants of syphilis among Aboriginal women in Winnipeg

NEW PODCAST SERIES OF MARCH 2019

Published in partnership with the National Collaborating Center for Aboriginal Health

Syphilis infection rates are rising in Winnipeg, Manitoba, and cases of infectious syphilis have more than doubled in 2018. These infections are associated with a lack of adequate housing and substance abuse, including methamphetamine. We also know that a disproportionate number of these women are aboriginal.

LISTEN:

  1. Interview with Pierre Plourde at the CBC on August 9, 2018 : “Syphilis rate in Winnipeg is at its highest level”.
  2. Exploring the determinants of syphilis among Aboriginal women in Winnipeg: Laverne Gervais
  3. Exploring the determinants of syphilis among Aboriginal women in Winnipeg: Marcia Anderson
  4. Congenital syphilis: Jared Bullard

NCCID spoke with Laverne Gervais and Dr. Marcia Anderson of Ka Ni Kanichihk to learn more about the determinants of syphilis transmission among Aboriginal women and what public health providers can do and primary care to help curb or stop the progression of syphilis in this community. We also discussed with Dr. Jared Bullard the recent increase in cases of congenital syphilis in Manitoba, the risks to the fetus, and prevention strategies.

Syphilis 2.0: the two faces of syphilis

A MOBILIZATION CALL TO FIGHT SYPHILIS IN A SUSTAINED AND COORDINATED WAY IN CANADA

Syphilis is back in Canada. Since the beginning of the new millennium, a resurgence of syphilis has been observed in several large urban centers across the country, particularly among men who have sex with men (MSM). But in recent years, the epidemiological profile has changed in some parts of Canada, and syphilis outbreaks have also been reported among heterosexual men and women, disproportionately affecting Aboriginal populations. This return of syphilis among heterosexual women has been accompanied by a return of cases of infections in pregnant women, sometimes followed by congenital cases. In November 2016, 42 public health experts met in Montrealto discuss efforts across the country to combat this infection. Physicians, nurses, epidemiologists, researchers, policy makers, community agency representatives and knowledge brokers took the opportunity to share experiences, ideas and best practices to curb the spread of syphilis in Canada.

Syphilis 1.0: a look at the future of syphilis

AN EXCHANGE OF INFORMATION ON INNOVATIVE APPROACHES TO CONTAIN SYPHILIS IN MSM

To support the collective effort to curb syphilis outbreaks reported in many Canadian urban areas, NCCID sponsored a knowledge exchange event between health professionals, community-based organizations and researchers from a number of large urban centers. More than 30 participants came together to discuss innovative ways to stop syphilis among MSM and to rethink public health strategies to better serve this sometimes difficult to reach clientele. You can consult online the document outlining the event and the summary of research results. comparing the effectiveness of interventions in syphilis prevention and management.

Notification to partners (NoPa)

Partner Notification (NoPa) is one of the pillars of public health in the prevention of sexually transmitted and blood borne infections (STBBIs). However, the relevance of this method has been questioned many times and many question the benefits of this practice given the costs. To answer this question, NCCID has developed a series of resources that gather scientific evidence from studies that compare the levels of effectiveness and benefits of different existing cost partner notification strategies. | See more

CATIE Forum 2015

MOBILIZATION OF LIVE KNOWLEDGE OF THE EXCHANGE FORUM

In order to allow a wider audience to benefit from the content of the discussions held at the CATIE Knowledge Exchange Forum, NCCID has posted short video clips featuring the various panellists of this forum that explain, in minutes , the highlights of this meeting. See the Dr. Jordan Feld discuss the era of change brought new treatment against hepatitis C, Dr. Darrell Tan talk about the urgent need to integrate the use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) HIV in medical practice, the re Nitika Pant Paicall to accelerate the use of new screening technologies in health services, re Alexandra King explain how the concept of Aboriginal affiliation is vital in HIV prevention strategies, and Laurie Edmiston , CATIE’s Executive Director, looking to the future and describing how the evolution of biomedical knowledge of HIV and hepatitis C has changed the course of history.


MONITORING

Reach 90-90-90 targets for HIV

WHAT ARE THE NEXT STEPS TO OPTIMIZE THE PROCESSES USED TO MEASURE PROGRESS IN CANADA?

In April 2017, the National Collaborating Center for Infectious Diseases (NCCID) held a knowledge sharing event on the development of estimates to measure progress toward the 90-90-90 targets in the provinces and territories, and at the national level. national. Read the report of this meeting, which summarizes the lessons learned from the provinces and territories participating in the event, the main challenges encountered, and the strategies and solutions discussed to improve data sources and future estimates.


PREVENTION

What is the buzz on PrEP? Why is public health listening?

In partnership with CATIE, NCCID presented ” What’s the buzz about PrEP? Why is public health listening?, A webinar for an audience of public health experts. The webinar highlights the social and legal aspects of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and discusses the acceptance and use of this new HIV prevention tool in gay communities in Canada’s major urban centers. The webinar allows public health stakeholders to reflect on and deepen their reflection on the indispensability of community involvement, identification processes and the prioritization of the beneficiaries of the community. PrEP, designing messages to PrEP consumers, managing programs, and adopting public health policies. Finally, it allows them to learn more about approaches implemented in other regions.

Prevention of HIV and Hepatitis C among youth from non-urban areas

Our partners in the Gender and Health Promotion Research Unit (HPHL) at Dalhousie University in Halifax are interested in youth and how to provide them with HIV prevention and prevention services. Hepatitis C designed for them. In order to share lessons learned, GAHPS invited a series of experts to discuss promising approaches in the prevention of STBBIs among young people. Visit the GAHPS website to learn about and understand these innovative strategies in a webinar entitled “From Local to Global: Finding Complementarities in HIV and Hepatitis C Prevention Approaches for Youth in Non-Urban Canada”. “. See more (the website is available in English only).

ÉVÉNEMENTS